Brandon P. Ledet

art & criticism from new orleans
Serial Mom features Kathleen Turner redefining suburban motherhood in a Lifetime-murder-movie-turned-screwball-comedy. Turner’s plays against type in this one and the idiosyncratic performance is accentuated by the oddball supporting cast. What other film can offer you star-power as diverse as Ricki Lake, Patty Hearst, Traci Lords AND Matthew Lillard? Not to mention a special performance from punk legends L7!Here, John Waters once again lampoons American television’s obsession with criminals & courtroom drama. Fame earned through crime is certainly a theme he’s explored elsewhere (Female Trouble, Pink Flamingos, Cecil B. Demented, etc.) but somehow it comes across as endearing in this one. Instead of earning Divine’s status of “The Filthiest Person Alive”, Kathleen Turner’s character is entirely pleasant. Even while she’s committing a murder you find yourself thinking “I wish she could be MY mom.”Although there are some deaths and raunchy gags, this is not the gory gross-out movie you’d expect after watching something like Female Trouble. The films were made twenty years apart and are very distant in tone. However, they do share a sharpened efficiency that distinguish them from some of Waters’s more chaotic work. No scene is wasted. Every gag delivers. Serial Mom is one of those precious instances of one the most distinct voices in film firing on all cylinders.

Serial Mom features Kathleen Turner redefining suburban motherhood in a Lifetime-murder-movie-turned-screwball-comedy. Turner’s plays against type in this one and the idiosyncratic performance is accentuated by the oddball supporting cast. What other film can offer you star-power as diverse as Ricki Lake, Patty Hearst, Traci Lords AND Matthew Lillard? Not to mention a special performance from punk legends L7!

Here, John Waters once again lampoons American television’s obsession with criminals & courtroom drama. Fame earned through crime is certainly a theme he’s explored elsewhere (Female Trouble, Pink Flamingos, Cecil B. Demented, etc.) but somehow it comes across as endearing in this one. Instead of earning Divine’s status of “The Filthiest Person Alive”, Kathleen Turner’s character is entirely pleasant. Even while she’s committing a murder you find yourself thinking “I wish she could be MY mom.”

Although there are some deaths and raunchy gags, this is not the gory gross-out movie you’d expect after watching something like Female Trouble. The films were made twenty years apart and are very distant in tone. However, they do share a sharpened efficiency that distinguish them from some of Waters’s more chaotic work. No scene is wasted. Every gag delivers. Serial Mom is one of those precious instances of one the most distinct voices in film firing on all cylinders.

found in The 7th Ward

found in The 7th Ward

We’re running a caterpillar farm and they’re getting monstrously fat off what used to be a thriving fennel plant.

This historic building is only 10 blocks away from my house and it’s about to be converted into a 4-screen cinema. I could not be more stoked about this.

This historic building is only 10 blocks away from my house and it’s about to be converted into a 4-screen cinema. I could not be more stoked about this.

This week in headphones.

This week in headphones.

New Orleans just Browns’d its pants.

My struggle with gout has just hit a new low. Last night I became that guy who wears camo flip-flops to a cocktail party.

Have a lot of options on how to spend my day tomorrow: Do I travel an hour to go see this young Scottish band PAWS that I never expected to play a show in Louisiana? Do I stay put and go see the Stuart Murdock musical or the Mark Duplass/Elizabeth Moss movie that both finally arrived in town? Do I sit out on all three and spend the rainy day indoors? My indecision has been getting bad lately but all these options sound really nice, no matter how it turns out.

The Mortal Kombat: Defenders of the Realm cartoon is hilariously dedicated to the mythology of the live-action movies and pushes their tone of the even further into kid-friendly territory. The gory violence of the game is even more toned down, the (rare) character deaths never occur onscreen, and an obscenely aggressive techno beat plays almost the entire run-time. Also, look at this dumbass bird-man character named Asgarth (voiced by John Rhys-Davies) who only appears in the final episode. Look at him. Other voice work includes Ron Pearlman as Stryker & Luke Perry as Sub-Zero. All 13 episodes are available on YouTube if you’re looking to test just how much you loved the movies and how little you value your time. For me it was a whole lot and very little, respectively.

The Mortal Kombat: Defenders of the Realm cartoon is hilariously dedicated to the mythology of the live-action movies and pushes their tone of the even further into kid-friendly territory. The gory violence of the game is even more toned down, the (rare) character deaths never occur onscreen, and an obscenely aggressive techno beat plays almost the entire run-time. Also, look at this dumbass bird-man character named Asgarth (voiced by John Rhys-Davies) who only appears in the final episode. Look at him.

Other voice work includes Ron Pearlman as Stryker & Luke Perry as Sub-Zero. All 13 episodes are available on YouTube if you’re looking to test just how much you loved the movies and how little you value your time. For me it was a whole lot and very little, respectively.

In case you were losing faith I’m here to reassure you that the Mortal Kombat movies still hold up. A+ No faults.

In case you were losing faith I’m here to reassure you that the Mortal Kombat movies still hold up. A+ No faults.